Dianne L. Chambless, Ph.D.
Merriam Term Professor of Psychology
Director of Clinical Training
Department of Psychology
University of Pennsylvania



The Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology

For information on the doctoral program in clinical psychology, please go to our web site.
If you have questions not covered by the web site, please contact Melissa Hunt, Ph.D., Associate Director of Clinical Training at mhunt@psych.upenn.edu.

Education History:
 

1979    Ph.D.    Clinical Psychology, Temple University
1972    M.A.    Psychology, Temple University
1969    B.A.
     Political Science, Newcomb College of Tulane University

Address:

Dept. of Psychology
University of Pennsylvania
3720 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA  19104-6241
USA

Telephone: 215-898-5030
Fax: 215-898-7301
E-mail: chambless@psych.upenn.edu

Courses Currently Taught:

Psychology 600-303, Proseminar in Psychopathology Psychology

Psychology 704, Research Methods in Clinical and Social Psychology

Psychology 709, Empirically Supported Therapies

Research Interests:

Anxiety disorders, cognitive-behavior therapy, prediction of treatment outcome, especially by family relationship factors (perceived criticism, expressed emotion), and identification of empirically supported psychological interventions.

Selected Honors

Klaus-Grawe-Award for the Advancement of Innovative Research in Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Klaus Grawe Foundation, 2011.

 

Aaron T. Beck Award for Significant and Enduring Contributions to Cognitive Therapy, Academy of Cognitive Therapy, 2010.

Selected Associate Editor, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2006.

Mentoring Award, Section IV (Clinical Psychology of Women), Society of Clinical Psychology (Division 12 of the American Psychological Association), 2002.

Florence Halpern Distinguished Professional Contributions Award, Society of Clinical Psychology (Division 12 of the American Psychological Association), 2000.

Selected Publications

Chambless, D. L., Blake, K. D., & Simmons, R. A. (2010). Attributions for relativesí behavior and perceived criticism: Studies with community participants and patients with anxiety disorders. Behavior Therapy, 41, 388-400. clearDOI:10.1016/j.beth.2009.11.001

 

Stewart, R. E., & Chambless, D. L.(2010). Interesting practitioners in training in empirically supported treatments: Research reviews versus case studies. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 66, 73-95.

 

Chambless, D. L., Floyd, F. J., Rodebaugh, T. L., & Steketee, G. (2007).  Expressed emotion and familial interaction: A study with agoraphobic and obsessive-compulsive patients and their relatives.  Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 116, 754-761.

 

Siev, J., & Chambless, D. L. (2007). Specificity of treatment effects: Cognitive therapy and relaxation for generalized anxiety and panic disorders. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 75, 513-522.

Chambless, D. L., & Ollendick, T. H. (2001). Empirically supported psychological interventions: Controversies and evidence. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 685-716.

Chambless, D. L., & Steketee, G.  (1999). Expressed emotion and the prediction of outcome of behavior therapy: A prospective study with agoraphobic and obsessive-compulsive outpatients.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 67, 658-665.

Chambless, D. L., & Hollon, S.  (1998). Defining empirically supported therapies.  Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 66, 7-18.

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