AGORAPHOBIC COGNITIONS QUESTIONNAIRE & BODY SENSATIONS QUESTIONNAIRE:
SCORING INSTRUCTIONS & CONDITIONS
Dianne L. Chambless, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Pennsylvania
3720 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA  19104-6241
E-mail: chambless@psych.upenn.edu
Web site: www.psych.upenn.edu/~dchamb






Conditions

You have my permission to download the measures for your clinical and research use, and for these purposes you may make as many copiesas you like.  It is expressly forbidden to make copies of these measures for sale or publication without my explicit written permission.  I hope that you will share information you might collect on these measures with me, especially research that speaks to their psychometric properties.

Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire

The ACQ consists of 14 items which may be scored as a total scale, or according to its two subscales: Loss of Control and Physical Concerns. Each of the subscales consists of 7 items. The subscale or total scores are calculated by averaging the responses to the individual items composing that score. If you include the optional "other" item in the scoring, then on subsequent testing you need to write in that item for the client to ensure he/she is responding to a consistent set of items.

Loss of Control Items: Act foolish, lose control, hurt someone, go crazy, scream, babble, paralyzed by fear.

Physical Concerns Items: Throw up, pass out, brain tumor, heart attack, choke, go blind, stroke.

Body Sensations Questionnaire

The BSQ total score consists of the average of responses to the 17 items, or of responses to whatever items the client rated if items were skipped. I would suggest that you consider the total score invalid if the client skipped more than 3 items. I would endeavor to get clients to complete every item to enhance reliability. See ACQ instructions for the "other" item.


Translations

For information on the Japanese translations of the ACQ and BSQ (provided on my web site)  please contact:

Toshiaki A. Furukawa, MD, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine,
Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences,
Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 JAPAN
Email: furukawa@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp Homepage:
http://www.ncupsychiatry.com Evidence-Based Psychiatry Center:
http://www.ebpcenter.com
TEL: +81-52-853-8271 FAX: +81-52-852-0837

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SCORING THE MOBILITY INVENTORY FOR AGORAPHOBIA AND CONDITIONS
Dianne L. Chambless, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Pennsylvania
3720 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA  19104-6241
E-mail: chambless@psych.upenn.edu
Web site: www.psych.upenn.edu/~dchamb

 Conditions

You have my permission to download this measure for your clinical and research use, and for these purposes you may make as many copies as you like.  It is expressly forbidden to make copies of these measures for sale or publication without my explicit written permission.  I hope that you will share information you might collect on these measures with me, especially research that speaks to their psychometric properties.

Avoidance. The MIA is scored by computing an average of the items on the Avoidance Alone scale and an average for the Avoidance Accompanied scale. Subjects are encouraged to skip items if the items are irrelevant to their lives. For example, they may have never had an opportunity to try a subway because none exists in their geographic region, or they have had no opportunity to attend a class as an adult and would be making an uneducated guess if they were to rate this item. However, such a strategy should result in no more than a few skipped items. If a subject skips more than 5 items, I would consider his/her questionnaire invalid. In a clinical setting, if many items are skipped, I would question his/her assertion that avoidance is not a factor.

On the other hand, a subject may give a rating for an item that makes no sense, i.e., giving an Avoidance Accompanied rating to the item, "Staying home alone." This happens despite my having crossed that item out for the Accompanied scale. Ignore this response. If you choose to include the "other" items in your averages, check them for suitability. If you give repeated administrations (e.g., before and after treatment), you should write in the same content for "other" items as the subject used the first time on subsequent questionnaires to assure stability of item content.

Panic Frequency is scored as a simple frequency count. Generally the scores are very skewed and a log transformation before parametric analysis or the use of nonparametric analysis is recommended.

Panic Intensity is given a 1 - 5 score depending on the response checked by the subject. If the subject has a 0 on Panic Frequency, he/she should be considered to have a missing datum on Panic Intensity even if he/she gives a response.

COMMUNITY SAMPLE NORMS FOR
THE AGORAPHOBIC COGNITIONS QUESTIONNIARE
THE BODY SENSATIONS QUESTIONNAIRE
THE MOBILITY INVENTORY FOR AGORAPHOBIA

Source: Bibb, J.L. (1988). Parental bonding, pathological development, and fear of losing control among agoraphobics and normals. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The American University, Washington, DC.
 
 
 
Variable M SD n
       
ACQ (14 item) 1.60 0.46 139
       
ACQ-Loss of Control      
Factor 1.89 0.70 139
       
ACQ-Physical Concerns Factor 1.31 0.33 139
       
BSQ 1.80 0.59 88
Mobility:      
Avoidance Alone 1.50 0.45 88
       
Mobility:      
Avoidance Accompanied 1.24 0.35 88

NB: Subjects in this sample were not screened for normality. They were faculty and staff of The American University who volunteered to participate in a questionnaire research project.

NORMS FOR CLIENTS DIAGNOSED AS HAVING AGORAPHOBIA WITH PANIC ATTACKS, SEEN AT THE AGORAPHOBIA AND ANXIETY PROGRAM, TEMPLE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL


    Mean SD Median  
Agoraphobic Cognitions           
(14 item version)   2.43 0.63 2.39 253
           
Body Sensations   3.02 0.85 3.08 254
           
Fear Questionnaire-          
Agoraphobia Factor    20.81 10.72 20.60 291
           
Main Phobia   6.44 2.02 7.14 205
           
Global Phobia   5.50 1.94 5.97 291
           
Mobility Inventory-          
           
Avoid Alone   3.22 1.01 3.20 356
           
Discomf. Alone   3.26 1.03 3.22 179
           
           
Avoid Acomp.   2.39 0.88 2.35 353
Discomf. Accomp.   2.54 0.77 2.50 178
           
Panic Frequency   3.07 3.88 2.11 300
           
Panic Intensity   3.19 1.00 3.01 176
           

Panic Intensity of the Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia
Dianne L. Chambless

Since the Panic Intensity scale was added to the Mobility Inventory after the publication of the latter, this paper is intended as a supplement to Chambless et al. (1985), to provide information on the measure of Panic Intensity (PI). The PI is a 1 (very mild) to 5 (extremely severe) scale on which the client checks his/her response, rating the intensity of panic attacks experienced during the last 7 days. No score can be obtained if Panic Frequency during that time was 0.

Data have been collected on the PI from a sample of 232 outpatients with a diagnosis of agoraphobia with panic attacks. The scale is normally distributed around a mean of 3.19 (SD=1.00). Reliability data are available on only 12 cases across a mean pretreatment interval of 20.42 days (SD=16.92). Reliability was a modest 0.66; however, this is good reliability for a one-item scale. There was some trend for the score to increase over time without treatment, although this was not significant, t = 1.83, df = 11, p = .094.

CORRELATIONS OF THE PI WITH OTHER MEASURES

 
 
 Measure          r      p
Avoidance Alone - Mobility Inventory   232 .19 .003
Avoidance Accomp. - Mobility Inventory   230 .18 .007
Panic Frequency - Mobility Inventory   148 .20 .001
Agoraphobic Cognitions Q.   230 .27 .001
Body Sensations Q.   174 .14 .062
Beck Depression   220 .32 .001
STAI - Trait Anxiety   219 .26 .001
Eysenck Neuroticism   158 .18 .021
Eysenck Psychoticism   158 .01 .942
Age   228 -.09 .19
Socioeconomic Status   211 .01 .86
Duration of Agoraphobia   203 -.02 .74
NB: Because panic frequency's distribution is highly skewed, the correlation of this variable with
panic intensity is a nonparametric Kendall tau b, rather than a Pearson coefficient.

Reference

Chambless, D.L., Caputo, G.C., Jasin, S.E., Gracely, E., & Williams, C. (1985). The Mobility Inventory for Agoraphobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 35-44.

Translations

For information on the Japanese translations of the Mobility Inventory (provided on my web site)  please contact:

Toshiaki A. Furukawa, MD, PhD
Professor and Chair, Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine,
Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences,
Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 JAPAN
Email: furukawa@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp Homepage:
http://www.ncupsychiatry.com Evidence-Based Psychiatry Center:
http://www.ebpcenter.com
TEL: +81-52-853-8271 FAX: +81-52-852-0837